Review: Fire Ritual Recording in The Strad

The Strad Issue: June 2019 
Description: ‘World music’ violin concertos receive fiery, thrilling performances

Theatrical, charismatic and intricately detailed, these two violin concertos by Tan Dun are the perfect showcase for his sensuous sound world.

As a teenager Tan became the conductor of a travelling Peking Opera troupe: echoes of its colourful style are never far from his delicate textures, recorded here with brilliance and vibrancy.

The first concerto, ‘Rhapsody and Fantasia’, grew out of an ancient opera melody. From this, Tan conjures an eclectic but immensely likeable work that somewhat improbably pits dance-worthy beats (in two movements entitled ‘hip-hop’) against a rich seam of lyricism from the violin.

Under the baton of the composer himself, Norwegian Eldbjørg Hemsing shows a deep affinity for this music, from the lush, yearning lyricism of the Rhapsody’s middle-movement Malinconia to the more esoteric Fantasia, in which lovely pinpricks of orchestral detail add shade to the violin’s searching lines.

The five-movement ‘Fire Ritual’ of 2018 builds on the earlier work’s sense of ceremonial, the violin pitted against the war-like, powerfully expressive declamations of the orchestra.

After the brittle march of the third movement, the tumult clears for the solo violin to emerge. The shared, gorgeous melody of strings and soloist in the fourth movement gives way to a final, sorrowing melody from the violin, perfectly judged by Hemsing: a haunting end to a compelling disc.

CATHERINE NELSON

https://www.thestrad.com/reviews/eldbj%C3%B8rg-hemsing-tan-dun/8915.article

Features on Hemsing Festival 2019

Hemsing Festival is an international chamber music festival in Aurdal in Valdres, and the artistic leaders are Eldbjørg and Ragnhild Hemsing. The two sister founded the festival in their hometown in 2013 and it takes place each year in week 8.

Eldbjørg Hemsing and her sister Ragnhild Hemsing are Artistic Directors of the Hemsing Festival. The festival´s goal is to facilitate “intimate encounters with great music”. The magical mood created by close contact between the audience and the musicians means a lot.

Please see following features from journals and radio which have been released on Hemsing Festival 2019:

WDR 3 Ton Art | Germany (DE): Das Hemsing Festival in Norwegen

BR Klassik | Germany (DE): Skitour beim Hemsing Festival

BR Klassik | Germany: Kein Fest ohne Hardanger Fiddel (DE)

Deutschlandfunk | Germany (DE): Mit Langlauf zu Debussy

SWR2 Treffpunkt Klassik| Germany (DE): Hemsing Festival in Norwegen

Radio klassik Stephansdom | Austria (DE): Kammermusik in Aurdal

Radio klassik Stephansdom | Austria (DE): Eldbjørg Hemsing

Review: Fire Ritual Recording in Süddeutsche Zeitung

« It is thanks to the young talents who not only want to ride old war horses, but also present new things, that the instrumental concerto as a genre will never die out. Norwegian violin princess Eldbjørg Hemsing already made a name for herself as an archaeologist when she successfully excavated the unconventional, surprisingly attractive violin concerto from 1914 by her fellow countryman Hjalmar Borgstrøm. Now she shows her interest in contemporary music. Together with the Oslo Philharmonic, conducted by the composer, she plays two Tan Dun concerts: “Rhapsody and Fantasia” and “Fire Ritual”, which was written for Hemsing. These pieces, in which Beijing opera, percussion thunderstorms and the most modern composition techniques blend together ingeniously, offer Hemsing every opportunity to fully unfold her sound fantasy. This ranges from flashing top notes and sharp glissandi to the imitation of traditional Chinese singing techniques or almost soundless whispering. This sounds attractive, enchanting and demands a soloist of eminent quality, like Hemsing. (Bis)»

https://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/klassikkolumne-noble-wehmut-1.4296605

Review: Dvořák&Suk Recording in The Strad (UK)

A splendid combination of purity and sweeping, Heifetz-like intensity

The Strad | By Julian Haylock, 16. November 2018

Dvořák’s sole Violin Concerto is not among his most free-flowingly spontaneous scores. It took him four years (on and off) to complete, by which time the intended dedicatee Joseph Joachim had grown tired of the project and, despite having already advised on several changes, was still unhappy about what he considered the terse bridge between the first and second movements and over-repetitious finale.

Only comparatively recently has it become virtually standard repertoire, yet is remains a problematic work requiring sensitive and impassioned advocacy to sound its best. This it receives in spades from Eldbjørg Hemsing, who sustains high standards of intonational purity and beguiling tonal lustre throughout even most awkward of passages. She also shapes phrases with a chamber-scale dynamic suppleness, in contrast to the majority of recorded players, whose tendency towards special pleading often leads to over-projection.

However, the star turn here is the Suk Fantasy, which sounds (no bad thing) like an evacuee soundtrack from the Golden Age of Hollywood, with Hemsing hurling herself into the fray with an almost Heifetz-like intensity and swashbuckling bravado. Alan Buribayev and the Antwerp Symphony Orchestra provide sterling support and the commendably natural recording opens out seductively when the SACD-surround track is activated.

Review: Dvořák & Suk Recording in Concerti (DE)

Effortless Intensity

Eckhard Weber | Concerti | 8. November 2018

She practically grew up with this work, she says. Indeed, young violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing feels noticeably at home in Dvořák’s Violin Concerto. The way she makes her instrument sing with an amazingly nuanced and beguiling tone full of vibrancy has compelling intensity. Nothing sounds laboured here, everything seems to happen spontaneously in this music. The Antwerp Symphony Orchestra under Alan Buribayev is extremely present and sensitive in this interaction and unfolds a tremendously broad spectrum of colours. The folkloristically inspired finale of the Violin Concerto impresses with light-footed verve and shimmering airiness. A new benchmark recording has been achieved here in every respect. The longingly agitated modernity of the fantasy of Dvořák’s pupil and son-in-law Josef Suk with its subtle shades and surprising changes additionally shows the great potential of Hemsing and her colllaborators.

Review: Dvořák&Suk Recording in Süddeutsche (DE)

“…mit der 28 Jahre alten Eldbjørg Hemsing begeistert nun wieder eine junge Geigerin aus Norwegen. Hemsing ist nicht nur eine feinsinnige und kluge Interpretin, sie entlockt ihrer Guadagnini auch einen sehr persönlichen, unverwechselbaren Geigenton. Zart, intim und filigran wirkt er im Kern, dabei aber selbst im gehauchten Piano noch sinnlich und klangvoll.”

Julia Spinola | 2. Oktober 2018 | Süddeutsche Zeitung

Es muss etwas Verzauberndes in den nordischen Fjorden und Berglandschaften liegen. Nachdem die bereits mehrfach preisgekrönte Vilde Frang die internationalen Podien erobert hat, begeistert mit der 28 Jahre alten Eldbjørg Hemsing nun wieder eine junge Geigerin aus Norwegen. Mit Musik des weitgehend unbekannten norwegischen Komponisten Hjalmar Borgström hatte sie im April ihr Debüt gegeben. Auch auf ihrer zweiten CD meidet sie jetzt die ausgetretenen Pfade und spielt neben Antonín Dvořáks Violinkonzert die selten zu hörende Fantasie in g-Moll für Violine und Orchester von Dvořáks Schwiegersohn Josef Suk. Hemsing ist nicht nur eine feinsinnige und kluge Interpretin, sie entlockt ihrer Guadagnini auch einen sehr persönlichen, unverwechselbaren Geigenton. Zart, intim und filigran wirkt er im Kern, dabei aber selbst im gehauchten Piano noch sinnlich und klangvoll. Im leidenschaftlichen Forte, etwa im Eröffnungsthema des Dvořák-Konzerts, beginnt dieser eindringlich singende Ton irisierend zu leuchten. Mit ein wenig Fantasie hört man hier den großen David Oistrach heraus, dessen Schüler Boris Kuschnir Hemsings Lehrer war.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN DEUTSCHLANDFUNK

Norwegian Discovery – Hemsing plays Borgström

Norwegian violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing shows courage. On her debut recording she performs a violin concerto of Hjalmar Borgström, which is almost not known, and one of Shostakovich, on which famous colleagues have overstretched themselves. But Eldbjørg Hemsing already in her first attempt succeeds with grandiosity.

Christoph Vratz | Deutschlandfunk | 3. Juni 2018

Eine Sinfonie von Joachim Kaiser? Eine Klaviersonate von Karl Schumann oder Ulrich Schreiber? Eine Kantate von Eleonore Büning oder Manuel Brug? Was uns heutzutage in der Literatur noch vergleichsweise häufig begegnet, dass Kritiker selbst zu Autoren werden, bildet in der Musik die Ausnahme. Dafür muss man schon zu Robert Schumann, Hector Berlioz oder Claude Debussy zurückgehen. Doch auch für sie gilt: Sie wurden und werden vor allem als Komponisten wahrgenommen, und erst in zweiter oder dritter Linie als Musikkritiker. Bei Hjalmar Borgström hingegen ist das anders. Von 1907 bis zu seinem Tod 1925 schrieb er in seiner norwegischen Heimat Musikkritiken und wurde damit zu einer nationalen Instanz. Das Komponieren geriet für ihn mehr und mehr zum “Nebenbei”. Umso erstaunlicher, dass er nebenbei 1914 ein Violinkonzert schreibt.

Allegro con spirito, so hat Borgström das Finale zu seinem Violinkonzert überschrieben. Die Geige eröffnet furios. Dann klinkt sich das Orchester ein und bereitet den Boden für die weitere Gestaltung des Eingangsthemas: Es dominiert pure Spiellust, halb ungarisch “alla zingarese”, halb im Sinne der norwegischen Fiddle-Tradition.

Komponist mit eigenem Kopf und ohne nationale Scheuklappen

Erinnert dieser Beginn des Finalsatzes nicht ein wenig an das Violinkonzert von Johannes Brahms? Die Intervalle bei der Sologeige, die ungezügelte Spielfreude? Originär norwegisch klingt das jedenfalls nicht. Dafür gibt es biographische Gründe. Denn Borgström hat vorwiegend in Deutschland, ab 1887 in Leipzig und ab 1890 in Berlin studiert, wo er in Ferruccio Busoni einen prominenten Fürsprecher fand. Borgström selbst war fasziniert von der Macht der Programmmusik im Sinne eines Franz Liszt und auch von der Klangsprache Richard Wagners. Wieder zurück in Norwegen war Borgströms Musik nur wenig Erfolg beschieden. Das lag sicher auch daran, dass sie eben kein spezifisch norwegisches Idiom aufweist wie bei Edvard Grieg. Auch Grieg hatte in Deutschland studiert, wollte aber in Norwegen eine nationale Tonsprache etablieren. Genau das wollte Borgström nicht. Er wählte einen eigenen Weg. Sein Œuvre ist insgesamt, mit je zwei Opern und Sinfonien, wenigen Konzerten und Solowerken, eher schmal.

Erst ein Mal, nämlich im Jahr 2008, ist Borgströms Violinkonzert auf CD dokumentiert worden, mit Jonas Båtstrand, dem Sinfonieorchester der Norrlandsoperan und Terje Boye Hansen am Pult. Jetzt liegt das Werk in einer Neueinspielung vor. Sie übertrifft die ältere Version deutlich. Dabei handelt es sich um die Debüt-CD der norwegischen Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing. Schon als Fünfjährige hat sie mit ihrer Schwester vor der Königsfamilie ihres Heimatlandes konzertiert. Mit elf Jahren trat sie erstmals mit den Philharmonikern aus Bergen auf. Mit 22 erfolgte ihr internationaler Durchbruch, als sie sich bei der Friedensnobelpreisverleihung in Oslo präsentierte. Studiert hat Hemsing unter anderem in Wien. Die Noten zu Borgströms Konzert bekam sie bereits vor einigen Jahren geschenkt, doch blieben sie zunächst unbeachtet in einer Ecke liegen. Als die Geigerin dann doch einen genaueren Blick wagte, war sie schnell entflammt. “Was für eine fantastisch schöne, romantische Musik, und dabei auch noch gut spielbar”, so wird Hemsing in der Wochenzeitung “Die Zeit” zitiert. Die Wiener Symphoniker unter Olari Elts eröffnen dieses Violinkonzert, und nach nur wenigen Takten tritt bereits die Sologeige hinzu, anders als in den gewichtigen Traditions-Konzerten von Beethoven und Brahms. Auch wenn der Einsatz der Pauke am Beginn doch ein bisschen an das Beethoven-Konzert erinnert.

Die Tempi der Sätze zwei und drei sind in beiden vorliegenden Einspielungen nahezu gleich. Nur im ersten Satz sind Eldbjørg Hemsing und das Wiener Orchester etwas langsamer unterwegs, dafür mit ungleich klarerem Gestus. Die Übergänge gelingen fließend und natürlich, die Steigerungen organisch. Hemsings Ton leuchtet hell, aber nicht grell oder vordergründig brillant. Sie spielt durchaus mit Schmelz, aber frei von Kitsch. Wenn im Mittelteil des ersten Satzes die Musik immer dramatischere Züge annimmt, wenn Sologeige und Orchester sich mehr und mehr in einen Disput steigern, behauptet sich Hemsing geradezu kühn – mit Kraft und gleichzeitig mit einem flammenden Ton.

Top-Geigerin mit großer Klangfarbenpalette

Eldbjørg Hemsing spielt auf einer Guadagnini-Geige aus dem Jahr 1754, die ihr eine Stiftung zur Verfügung gestellt hat. Das Instrument ist, selten genug, fast noch im Originalzustand. Man muss sich nicht allzu weit aus dem Fenster lehnen, um zu behaupten, dass man von Hemsing künftig noch einiges hören wird. Denn wie sie im langsamen Satz mit warmen, fast bronzenen Klangfarben arbeitet, um zwischenzeitlich mit größter Selbstverständlichkeit den Ton ins Silbrige zu verlagern, das zeugt von großer Klasse und verspricht einiges für ihre Zukunft.

Was diese Einspielung so besonders macht, ist die Selbstverständlichkeit, mit der Eldbjørg Hemsing die leisen und sehr leisen Passagen meistert. Dann lässt sie ihre Geige wundervoll singen: geheimnisvoll und poetisch, arios und tänzerisch. unterstützt durch die zarten Zupfer der Streicher und kurze Intermezzi der Klarinette.

Vieles an dieser neuen Einspielung ist ungewöhnlich, vor allem das Programm. Denn eine direkte Verbindungslinie zwischen Hjalmar Borgström und Dmitri Schostakowitsch gibt es nicht. Als der Norweger 1925 mit 61 Jahren starb, war sein russischer Kollege erst noch auf dem Sprung zu einer großen Karriere. Schostakowitschs erstes Violinkonzert entstand 1948, zu einer Zeit, als die stalinistische Partei sein Schaffen mit Argus-Augen überwachte. Was nicht mit ihren Richtlinien konform ging, wurde abgelehnt, und der Komponist hatte Repressalien zu fürchten. Daher erfolgte die Premiere dieses Konzertes erst im Jahr 1955 mit David Oistrach als Solist.

Auch in diesem Konzert bilden Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing, die Wiener Symphoniker und Olari Elts eine Einheit. Das zeigt besonders der schroffe Gegensatz zwischen dem dunklen, einleitenden Notturno und dem bizarren Scherzo. Wie hier die säuselnden Bläser, Bassklarinette und Flöte, mit den schroffen Akzenten der Solovioline kontrastieren, das verrät Schärfe, Bitternis und, bezeichnend für Schostakowitsch, beißenden Humor. Das gilt in gleichem Maße für die sich unmittelbar anschließende Passage, wenn die Geige das Kommando übernimmt und die Streicher hinzutreten.

Verträumt bis bärbeißig – Schostakowitschs erstes Violinkonzert

Eldbjørg Hemsing ist gewiss kein musikalischer Muskelprotz, dem es in erster Linie auf äußere Effekte ankommt. Die Norwegerin erweist sich als sensible Künstlerin, die sich und ihren Ton immer wieder genauer Prüfung unterzieht. Daher findet sie für jede Stimmung einen adäquaten Ausdruck, ob verträumt und nach innen gekehrt oder bärbeißig und virtuos. Ihre technischen und musikalischen Fähigkeiten gehen Hand in Hand. Wenn es, wie im Finalsatz von Schostakowitschs erstem Violinkonzert, schnell zugeht, spiegelt diese Aufnahme den experimentellen Geist des Komponisten. Doch trotz der vielen, teils schnellen rhythmischen und dynamischen Umschwünge: Hemsings Geige klirrt nie, auch geraten die kurzen Linien nicht aus dem Fokus. Die Solistin weiß genau, wo sie hinmöchte und wie sie die Höhepunkte ansteuern muss, um deren ganze Wirkung so spontan und natürlich wie möglich herauszuarbeiten. Das ist eindrucksvoll und rundet den sehr positiven, stellenweise herausragenden Gesamteindruck dieser neuen Produktion ab.

Heute haben wir Ihnen die Debüt-CD der Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing vorgestellt. Mit den Wiener Symphonikern und Olari Elts hat sie Violinkonzerte von Hjalmar Borgström und Dmitri Schostakowitsch aufgenommen, erschienen ist sie als SACD beim schwedischen Label BIS.